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Classroom Tip

How to Check for Comprehension during Input or Direct Instruction

The teacher presents a variety of contextual material to the students, using visual reinforcement. At each phase of the input, the teacher checks for comprehension by asking a variety of questions to the class as a whole. The teacher encourages students to work in pairs or small groups to respond to the questions. Calling on one student at a time to respond to the comprehension checks is counter-productive. It takes a lot of time and dampens student interest.

EXAMPLE: "My Favorite Activities"

Teacher presents a slide program or a series of pictures that illustrate the language text to be learned by the students.

I like to read. I like to read news magazines. I like to read the "LA Times" newspaper. I don't like to read the "Orange County Register" newspaper. I like to read weblogs on the Internet. I love to read books about teaching. I don't like to read movie magazines!

  1. Do I like to read magazines?
  2. Do I like to read movie magazines?
  3. Do I like to read news magazines or movie magazines?
  4. What do I like to read more, newspapers or news magazines?

I like to dance. I like to dance with my friends. I like to dance international dances. I like to dance with my family. I like to dance in California. I like to dance all day, especially in the evening, around 8 o'clock. I don't like to dance alone.

  1. Do I like to dance alone?
  2. Do I like to dance alone or with my friends?
  3. Do I like to dance salsa?
  4. Do I like to dance hip-hop?
  5. Do I like to dance salsa or hip-hop?
  6. Do I like to dance in the morning?
  7. Do I like to dance more in the morning or at night?
  8. Where do I like to dance?
  9. What do I like to dance?

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